Repicci II®
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FAQ
What is Osteoarthritis of the Knee?
Total Knee Surgery
Unicompartmental Knee Surgery
The History of Unicompartmental Knee Replacements
How Long Might A Unicompartmental Implant Last?
Why Receive A Repicci II Unicompartmental Implant?
Who Can Benefit From Repicci II Unicondylar Reconstruction?
The Repicci II Unicondylar Program State-of-the-Art Treatment
References


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Total Knee Surgery

In total knee replacement, up to an 8" incision is made, and the knee cap is dislocated, exposing the surfaces of the knee. Up to 1/2" of bone is removed from the femur and the tibia to accommodate the knee implant. After surgery, most patients stay in the hospital for several days and follow up with extensive physical therapy. The long-term result is usually excellent, but it can take many months for the patient to fully regain the function of their new knee joint (Figure 2).

Full Knee Replacement

Figure 2

Total knee implants used to resurface all three compartments of the knee.






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