Repicci II®
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FAQ
What is Osteoarthritis of the Knee?
Total Knee Surgery
Unicompartmental Knee Surgery
The History of Unicompartmental Knee Replacements
How Long Might A Unicompartmental Implant Last?
Why Receive A Repicci II Unicompartmental Implant?
Who Can Benefit From Repicci II Unicondylar Reconstruction?
The Repicci II Unicondylar Program State-of-the-Art Treatment
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Why Receive A Repicci II Unicompartmental Implant?


With the development of modern-day Repicci II implants and surgical techniques, many advantages exist for using a unicompartmental "retread" compared to a total knee.

Smaller Incision
Using a video camera and an arthroscope, the entire knee is examined. If the patella and one tibial surface appear healthy, then an incision extending approximately 3" is used to implant the Repicci II components. This is much smaller than the 8" incision required for a total knee, thereby leaving a more pleasing cosmetic appearance after surgery is completed.

Less Blood Loss
Quite often patients are required to donate blood before total knee replacement providing blood to replace the quantity lost during surgery. The Repicci II technique generally eliminates the need for blood transfusion.

Lower Morbidity
Since the knee joint is examined with an arthroscope, the patello-femoral articulation, or the knee cap, is not disturbed during the procedure, greatly reducing the disruption to the joint associated with total joint surgery. Benefits of a less invasive procedure include less postoperative discomfort, a shorter hospital stay, less physical therapy, and more rapid healing.

Shorter Recovery Time
Most Repicci II patients walk on their resurfaced knee the same day as surgery, and are generally released from the hospital the next day. Within two weeks most patients are driving a car and resuming most normal daily activities. With a total knee replacement, recovery time can be four to five times longer. Also, with a total knee replacement, extensive physical therapy may be required.

Less Bone Removed
Only about 1/4" of bone on one compartment of the knee is removed to properly fit Repicci II implants. In total knee replacement all knee surfaces lose up to 1/2" of bone on each of the three compartments. Since Repicci II implants save more bone, future total knee replacement procedures can more easily be performed if necessary.






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